CIAA Celebrates Black History Month

 

Charlotte, NC (February 1, 2018)- The CIAA proudly celebrates black history 365 days of the year and joins the nation in the month of February in highlighting the positive contributions of African Americans by celebrating Black History Month. Student-athletes from CIAA member institutions provided feedback to three questions referring to Black History Month asked by the CIAA: What does Black History Month mean to you? Who is someone from your institution, past or present, that you admire? And Is there a favorite event or tradition that you practice during Black History Month? Several of the student-athletes will be featured on social media posts, that will be showcased throughout the month of February.

 

Amir Hall

 (Football | Bowie State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Personally, Black History Month is a time to recognize and appreciate what our ancestors and our political figures did, which have enabled us to freely do the things we want to do today. 

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

At Bowie State University, one person I admire and look up to is my football coach, Moses Ware. Coach Ware has been coaching me for about three years now and it has been a great experience. He is a father of three girls, and although he doesn't physically live with them, he supports and cares for them as if he's with them every moment. He motivates me to work hard everyday and to chase after my dreams. Although, I have chosen Coach Ware, there are many individuals from Bowie State university who I look up to and who have shaped me into the person I am today.


 

Shalom Omo-Osagie

 (Volleyball | Bowie State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month, to me, means the opportunity and the ability to celebrate the impeccable African Americans who came before me. In all honesty, it shouldn't be only a month. We should learn about the amazing African American men and women, the ones we don't hear about, everyday. But I am glad that we are given time to talk about, explore, and marvel in the spectacular contributions African Americans have made toward this country throughout the years. As an African American creative woman myself, it means that I get a platform to not only learn about these people, but apply it through song, dance, and plays to show my gratitude. 

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

At Bowie State, I admire my coach Bernadette Carroll. I admire her for many different reasons. Her strength, her determination, her tough love, and her ability to juggle and balance whatever life throws at her, and still succeed. Coming into the volleyball program I was not very sure of how well I would fit in with the team. As a walk on I was very nervous and concerned on whether or not I was going to do well, since I hadn't played volleyball since high school. Above all odds, Coach Carroll welcomed me with open arms, encouraged me day after day, and always had patience with me.While having patience she continues to challenge me and push me to my limits, which makes me excited for next season as I grow in the program with her. 

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

My favorite event during Black History Month has changed throughout the years. I've always loved performing, so I have always involved in some type of showcase or school assembly which included dancing, singing, or acting, since elementary school. Almost every year I find some sort of showcase to enter into to enlighten the audience about something significant to Black History Month and I give myself a platform for all the creative ideas that run through my head.  


  

Tyler Bembry

 (Football | Chowan University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black history month to me is the celebration of achievement that African-Americans have made in the world. It's a time to look back and reflect on how far the black community has come. It gives me a sense of pride to know what we came from. Knowing that we can achieve anything we desire.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

A person I looked up to at Chowan University is Anthony Joffrion. Joff was my mentor here at Chowan. He was also my captain on the defensive line my freshman year. He showed me the ropes and kept me away from trouble. For that he will always have my respect. 

 


 

Danielle Weldon

 (WBKB | Chowan University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month means the celebration of Black excellence. It's purpose is to remember and recognize the contributions made by Black people despite the seemingly relentless effort to oppress us.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

I have admiration for Dr. Cicely J. Cottrell. She is a criminal justice professor here at Chowan University and has spent time being an officer in a correctional facility. I admire her because she works hard for each of her students and inspires me to continue my education.

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

During the month of February, my family and I read from The African American Century: How Black Americans Have Shaped our Country by Cornel West and Henry Lewis Gates Jr.. We each pick out a person in this book that we do not know much about. We read up on the person and their accomplishments and share with the family what we learned. It's always interesting and fun to see who can get the farthest in the book without looking up their name.


 

Jalyn Brown

 (XC/WBKB | Elizabeth City State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black History is a month where we show thanks and gratitude to the leaders that fought for freedom and equality of the African American race. 

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it? And why?

I admire my advisor Dr. Ogwu, my professors Dr. Amadi, Dr.Oriaku, Dr. Nwala, former Coaches Alico Dunk , Ron Woodard, Current Coaches Antonio Davis and Daphnie Johnson. These people have played and influential part in the making and molding of me as a young woman. They have spent an immense amount of time pouring their divine wisdom into my life.

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

At my church we have a play and we sing hymns that the Civil Rights leaders sung. We also have mimicking play that gives the facts on famous African Americans.


 

Ja'na Boyd

 (Bowling | Elizabeth City State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month to me means to just feel good being black. In society, Blacks are being portrayed in a bad light or being involved in horrible situations. Personally, I think Black History Month is a way to appreciate the legacy that so many people fought and risked their life for. Today we have so many advantages compared to when we could not even drink from the same fountain as others. I love learning about Black Excellence and the great things that we have created on this earth. That's why I chose to go to a HBCU. We are wonderful human beings and we deserve credit and recognition just as much as other races.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

I admire Mr. Clarence Goss, my graphic design professor. Mr. Goss is someone who doesn't get enough credit. He graduated from Elizabeth City State University and he came back to ECSU to continue to impact the students from his alma mater, and to help students like me to become great. Mr. Goss has helped me, pushed me, comforted me, supported me, and taught me so much within four years and I truly appreciate everything that he has done for me! 

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

I love the MLK march, it's powerful to see my school come together and to keep Dr. King's dream alive. I know he would be proud to see the progress we have made. We can do so much more now that they were struggling to obtain. I think we tend to forget the privileges we have and how we can use them for good rather than evil. That was MLK's whole dream, to love one another, rather than break each other down. 

 

 

 

Tony Credle

 (Football | Fayetteville State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month means more to me than just celebrating the past achievements of great African-American role models. To me, it is a means of showing young African-Americans that we can strive to make a difference in our communities. No matter how small, we may think the service is, we ALL can give back. Black History Month is a time to help build up the minds of the young to become aware of their surroundings. I feel as though we should view Black History Month as a time to build and train our minds to think more highly of our own race and help lift each other up.
 
At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?
 
The person that I admire the most is Mr. Julian Capel. When I see Mr. Capel, he is never down and never has a negative outlook on life. He makes you feel at home and welcomes you to the institution. He strives to make that personal connection with each student. By my judgment of his character, he is truly a great man.
When I reflect on the service held at the Felton J. Capel Arena on the campus of Fayetteville State University to pay respects to the basketball coaching legend, Jeff Capel Jr., who died this past November, I saw Julian Capel keeping the same theme in his life – to help people.

 

 


 

Courtney Best

 (WBKB  | Fayetteville State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month is the one month our nation has dedicated to solely honor African-Americans and their accomplishments and contributions to American history. Black men and women have made a significant impact worldwide in sports, politics, inventions, and culture. February (albeit the shortest month out of the year) is the time the nation publicly celebrate our history. While it is special to have everyone come together for Black History Month, I am a strong advocate for teaching Black history 365 days a year because all of our history cannot be taught in one month. 

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

I admire my grandmother who attended Fayetteville State when it was called Fayetteville Teachers College in the 1940s. Her name was Mary Irene Davis-Goode. I have been told that she played basketball and both of us were about the same height. Although I have been told that she played intramural basketball, I still think that it's ironic how over 70 years later her granddaughter is following in her footsteps at her alma mater. 

I admire her because she was a fantastic woman who did not let anything stop her from gaining a higher education. I can only imagine the many challenges and barriers African-American females faced back then to earn a degree. When I think of her challenges, I feel like I really have no excuse for not getting a degree. 

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.   

My favorite tradition during Black History Month is going to the various BHM events downtown in my hometown in the city of Raleigh, NC. Another fun thing I like to do is trying to see how many days during the month I can go without using or consuming the inventions of African- Americans like potato chips, an elevator, pencil sharpener, and an ironing board. I guarantee that anyone can really see how African-Americans changed the world if they tried this self-deprivation exercise.


 

Lexus Perkins

 (Cheerleading | Fayetteville State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

I believe Black History Month is a time where African-American citizens can reflect on how far we've come in our history. Being that our heritage was taken from us when our ancestors arrived here on slave ships, it shows how we have overcome obstacles and created a new life within a system that was set up for us to fail.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

At Fayetteville State University, a former student-athlete that I admire is Ms. RaGeeni Coleman. I admire Ms. Coleman because she not only graduated from this illustrious institution, but she continues to give back to the community, the university, and mentors girls that are now apart Cheer Phi Smoov, the cheerleading program of the school. At Homecoming we learned that she assisted in fundraising just under $60K for the university over the past three years in her roles as President of the Cheer Phi Smoov Alumni Chapter, first runner up 2016-17 Ms. FSU Alumni, and now as the reigning 2017-18 Ms. FSU Alumni. I hope to become the same positive role model for future student-athletes.

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

One Black History Month tradition I recently started is visiting the African-American History Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum is a reminder of those who have paved the way for the freedoms I now have as an African-American female. It educates me on the hardships that they endured and conquered, so that my peers and I can share the same rights as everyone else.

 

 

 

Jordan Shaw

 (Football | Johnson C. Smith University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black history Month to me is a testament to HBCU Pride. A sense that all the heritage and freedom that was fought for centuries ago has stood high and is still as rich as once before.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why? 

Dr. Bryan Patterson is a very influential professor at JCSU and has touched a lot of students from all over the world. Dr. Patterson, a University of Florida graduate has many different certifications under has belt. One of his best qualities is the ability to merge bridges, by breaking down barriers amongst students. Dr. P is able to reach his students by relating to their "real life" experiences; he meets them where they are. He encourages students to understand that their past experiences do not have to determine their futures.


 

Kaitlin Santos

 (Bowling/Softball | Johnson C. Smith University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you?

I believe that Black History Month is a time where students and families learn and celebrate the achievements of African-Americans in the United States, Canada, United Kingdoms, and the Netherlands. To me, this is a time where I can observe, listen, and learn the history of African-Americans. Especially coming from Hawaii, where the predominant race is Asian, due to the Asian migration to Hawaii for Sugar and Pineapple plantations. By attending Johnson C. Smith University, which happens to be a HBCU, I am being more informed and introduced to the culture, historical facts, and traditions of African-Americans. 

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it? And why?

At Johnson C. Smith University a professor that I look up to is Dr. Tracy Brown. Dr. Brown teaches Organic Chemistry I and II, and numerous other courses. She motivates me to be a better student and person, by always pushing me to do more than the expected. She teaches me about work ethic and professional skills each time I attend her class. Dr. Brown has impacted my life, by building a student relationship with me and other students. 

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

I haven't experienced an event or tradition during Black History Month. However, by attending a HBCU, I intend to go to events and traditions to get an experience of the culture. I intend to learn and gain knowledge, while partaking in the events, as well as, making a new tradition during Black History Month. 


 

Andre Price

 (Football | Lincoln (PA) University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

"It may be necessary to encounter the defeats, so you can know who you are, what you can rise from, how you can still come out of it."  — Maya Angelou

Black History Month is the recognition of strength and courage from leaders both past and current for their perseverance to keep pushing forward. Whether it be patent inventors like Thomas L. Jennings and Madam C. J. Walker or Civil Rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks, their perseverance to continue fight through defeat to their eventual and inevitable success resonated so strongly with me that ever since a young age I recognized the importance to have a character trait to preserve. This is largely credited to the importance and utilization of Black History Month to not only teach important successes in black history but how those successors failed and kept going.

Maya Angelou's quote not only serves as motivation for me to keep pushing through my trials and tribulations but when I am asked what Black History Month means to me, I feel there is no better response than the words of one of the, if not the greatest, poet to ever live.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

One administrator I admire is Caprice Love. She's our program assistant with athletics, I admire her because she's always been well connected with the entire student athlete body at Lincoln. As a player coming all the way from California she's made a lot things happen for me throughout hard times being out here without family. During last Thanksgiving she invited me over to spend the day with her and her family, so that I wouldn't be alone on campus. She's shown show much love and support not only to me, but a lot of my teammates and she's definitely someone I appreciate having in our athletic department staff.  

 

 

Diamond Mickle

 (WBKB | Lincoln (PA) University)
 

What does black history month mean to you?

Black History Month is a time where I am reminded about what it means to be an African American. It reminds me of how glamorous we really are. Also, it is a time to thank those African Americans for giving all of us hope and the opportunity to reach even greater heights. It isn't just a reminder about all the bad times, instead it's about leadership, determination, courage, integrity, and loyalty. It informs the young people of the sacrifices and struggles that those before them made to be where we are today. I believe it is important we reflect and celebrate the outstanding significance of African American history and use them as a platform for future growth.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it? And why?

A former African American student-athlete at Lincoln University I admire is Mr. Gerard Garlic. He was a former college basketball star at Goucher College. He chose to play at Goucher college knowing the basketball team had a history of losing.  He and a high school friend of his decided they would change the program around which they did accomplish. His freshman season they lost in the playoffs but his next two years he helped lead them to win two championships. Mr. Garlic loved basketball, but he knew at a young age basketball will come to an end. He completed college and became Lincoln's Title IX and Director of the Wellness Center. Mr. Garlic has great determination and has helped motivate me not to give up on any goals I set my mind to.  

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year?

Every February my family and I visit different museums, attractions, and venues to pay homage to the city's African-American history. In January we visited the African American museum in Philadelphia. It has a diverse collection of fine art, photographs, costumes, and more. Our main objective is to experience, appreciate, and learn more about African American history through different attractions all over the world each year.


 

Nanayakkara Crishanthi

 (Bowling/Tennis/Volleyball | Livingstone College)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you?    

Black History Month is a time when African-Americans, The United States as a nation and also the rest of the world takes the time to honor and celebrate the achievements and also recognize the struggles of African-Americans from past history till date. It is a time for which the essential role of too-often neglected accomplishments of Black people in every area of endeavor is acknowledged and acclaimed.  

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

Quanera Hayes may not be old but she is definitely historic, she is in my opinion an African American woman who continues to defy the odds and illustrate what it means to be young, black and proud. Quanera Hayes is an African-American sprinter specializing in the 400 meters, holding the fastest time in the event in the world so far this season, at 49.72 seconds, even after just three weeks earlier before she competed, she had a painful bone marrow transplant in which marrow cells were drawn from her hip and injected into her stress fracture-plagued leg. She also finished 8th and missed being selected for the Rio relay team at the Olympic trials just a year before, but despite all these setbacks, she continues to push forward and work towards achieving her goals to become the best at what she does. She is the definition of what a strong, determined black woman is and she inspires me everyday. 

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.     

On February 12, 1909, the centennial anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, The NAACP was founded, I celebrate the founding of the NAACP because I appreciate and support its core mission which is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of ALL persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination. It also holds significant meaning for me because I was also born on the 12th of February. 


 

Shakera Hall

 (Track & Field/Volleyball | Saint Augustine's University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History month means a lot to me because this is the time of the year where we can celebrate the pain and hard work the Black African-Americans went through to allow us to have freedom today.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

The coach that I admire is Mr. George Williams. Mr. Williams has many achievements to his name and that inspires me a lot to be the best I can be in everything I do. Mr. Williams helped Saint Augustine's University become a popular because of his Olympic achievements and his Olympic athletes. Also, the icing on the cake is the fact that he leads the NCAA for the most wins in history. 

 


 

Myia Jones

 (Volleyball | Virginia State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History month to me is not just a month to celebrate but it is a time of reflection. It is a time to think about those who came before you and the sacrifices they made that effects the way you live life now. The more I reflect on black history it makes me have more pride for my skin color, it motivates me to strive for excellence in everything I do because I know my ancestors would have done anything to be able to live their dreams the way I'm able to live mine.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

At Virginia State University, I admire Mrs. Peggy Davis, our Athletic Director and Mrs. Deborah C. Mallory our Associate Athletic Director for Compliance. I met them my freshman year at Virginia State and every year I have got to know them a little better. They are two very strong minded individuals and I admire their determination and drive. Honestly I would not have some of the opportunities I have had without their support and encouragement.

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

One of the things that I make it a point to do each year during Black History month is to read at least one book by an African- American. So often we take advantage of the ability to read and write, when our ancestors did everything they could to learn what some take for granted. 


 

Jamel McAllister

 (Baseball | Virginia State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month to me means the celebration of achievements by African American who stood up against Caucasian's so that we could be treated equally. It also shows our strength, dedication, determination, leadership, unity, and courage.  I used these terms because they were the main traits inhibited by people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman, Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou and many more. 

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

Coach Herbert Wheat a former Assistant Baseball Coach at Virginia State University whom I met playing Legion Ball was an inspiration to me.  I admire him because he always pushed me to become better at every aspect of the game and he would be there to help me when I made a mistake.  His dedication to the sport and me afforded me the opportunity to get the best of both worlds.

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

My favorite event/tradition during Black History Month is to see baseball players wear the number 42, the reason I like this event is because I play baseball and without Jackie Robinson paving the way I wouldn't be able to play today. I contribute to this event by writing forty-two on my cleats and on my wrist tape in honor of the late great Jackie Robinson.


 

Breana Miller

 (Softball | Virginia Union University)
 

What does black history month mean to you?

Black history month is a time to celebrate the importance of what it means to be African American. We stand on the ground of people who have sacrificed for us to have what we have today. Many African Americans risked their lives every day for us to have racial equality.  It also allows for a time to reflect on America today and what things still need our attention to change. Black History Month is taught in schools allowing it to be spread among all generations, but It is a also an avoided topic and month that is not celebrated amongst multiple institutions, including mine.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

Felicia Johnson and Joe Taylor are two powerful administrators that have impacted Virginia Union's athletics. In my four years here they have been a power house for making things happen. When it comes to getting us things that we don't have, they make it happen and this is important to black history because we are a small HBCU with limited funding. They use their voice to push and get us the things we need to succeed. We have lacked have a lot of things in the past that many other universities have. The small things such as adequate trainers and equipment make a difference. 

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

During the month I try to seek information on something new that I did not know before and visiting places that hold value to the African American culture, such as museums and MLK monument.

 


 

Jamel McAllister

 (MBKB | Winston-Salem State University)
 

What does Black History Month mean to you? 

Black History Month to me is a time where you take a chance to look at how Black people as a community and culture have grown. I give thanks to those before me, who laid the groundwork and fought for the rights I have today. To me Black History Month is more than just a month, because I believe it should be celebrated everyday, but it is definitely a time of celebration.

At your institution, is there an African American former student-athlete, coach, administrator or professor that you admire, who is it?  And why?

An African American that I admire from WSSU is most definitely Earl "The Pearl" Monroe. He was a basketball player here and the best to come through here. When I first got recruited here I wanted to wear his number without even knowing he wore it and it had been retired. His work ethic and the things he accomplished, is something I strive for if not more, every day.

If you have a favorite event or tradition during Black History Month, provide a statement on why you partake every year.

I don't really have a tradition for Black History Month, but I have thought about wearing something in games during this month to symbolize black history month.